MANAGING DIRECTOR, EHSAN ABDULLAH ADDRESSING ALL THE WORKERS.

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EHSAN ABDULLAH, MANAGING DIRECTOR, MITALI GROUP ADDRESSING RIOTING WORKERS

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EHSAN ABDULLAH, MANAGING DIRECTOR, MITALI GROUP ADDRESSING RIOTING WORKERS

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MANAGING DIRECTOR EHSAN ABDULLAH ADDRESSING WORKERS

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MANAGING DIRECTOR EHSAN ABDULLAH ADDRESSING WORKERS

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AKBAR ALI KHAN, OC KASHIMPUR THANA ADDRESSING THE MEDIA, IT WAS RUMOUR FUELLED BY A VESTED QUARTER TO CREATE ANARCHY. SHOW MORE – EHSAN ABDULLAH PRESS BRIEF

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AKBAR ALI KHAN, OC KASHIMPUR THANA ADDRESSING THE MEDIA, IT WAS RUMOUR FUELLED BY A VESTED QUARTER TO CREATE ANARCHY. SHOW MORE – EHSAN ABDULLAH PRESS BRIEF

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EHSAN ABDULLAH, MANAGING DIRECTOR, MITALI GROUP – FIRST PRESS BRIEFING NOVEMBER 01, 2018

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EHSAN ABDULLAH, MANAGING DIRECTOR, MITALI GROUP – FIRST PRESS BRIEFING NOVEMBER 01, 2018

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EHSAN ABDULLAH, MANAGING DIRECTOR, MITALI GROUP OF INDUSTRIES – ADDRESSING MEDIA

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EHSAN ABDULLAH, MANAGING DIRECTOR, MITALI GROUP OF INDUSTRIES – ADDRESSING MEDIA

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DAUGHTER OF SLAIN BANGLADESH LEADER ENTERING THE POLITICAL WARS

DAUGHTER OF SLAIN BANGLADESH LEADER ENTERING THE POLITICAL WARS

STUART AUERBACH . SEPTEMBER 10, 1981

The door was unlocked reverently and inside stood a large unmade bed filled with an untidy jumble of clothes. Off to one side were shelves with shoes, and a dust-covered rack holding a man’s pipes was thrown on the floor. There were splattered stains on the far wall that the guide said were blood.

This is the second-floor bedroom of the father of Bangladesh, Sheikh Mujibur Rahman, looking today exactly as it did when it was returned to his relatives after he and most of his immediate family were slain in that house as part of a bloody coup on Aug. 15, 1975.

Across the family living room, behind another locked door, is the front staircase where a framed Bangladesh flag covers the spot on the stairs where Mujib’s bullet-riddled body was found. His blood was reported to be still on the steps, covered by the flag.

The family house was taken over last week by Mujib’s 34-year-old daughter, Sheik Hasina Wazed, who was elected president in February of his Awami League party while she was still in exile in New Delhi. She and her sister, both out of the country at the time, were the only members of his immediate family to escape the 1975 assassination.

Her rise to power within the party responsible for the founding of Bangladesh illustrates the dynastic quality of politics in South Asia, where India’s Indira Gandhi took over from her father, Jawaharlal Nehru, and now is grooming one son to succeed her after another died in a plane crash.

In Pakistan, the chief opponents to the martial law government of Mohammed Zia ul-Haq are the wife and daughter of executed former president Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto and in Sri Lanka, former prime minister Sirimavo Bandaranaike took over from her late husband and now is battling her son for leadership of the opposition party.

“Whatever I have is because of the people’s love of my father, so they love me and respect me too,” said Sheik Hasina during an interview here last week in the library of her father’s home, with the neatly labeled shelves filled with his books arrayed behind his small desk at which she sat.

Her aim is to avenge her father’s death, and leaving his house–bloodstains and all–as a monument to the massacre of her family appears to be part of that aim.

Since her father’s assassination president Ziaur Rahman–himself slain three months ago–has built up a formidable personal following and political machine that the acting president, Abdus Sattar, has inherited.

Sattar, though he is 75 and ailing, is favored in the Nov. 15 elections, which were twice postponed to meet Awami League demands.

The acting president, a former justice of the Bangladesh Supreme Court before he was appointed vice president, has pledged to continue the policies of Ziaur Rahman. Since he is considered too infirm to rule for very long if he should win the election, most of the politicking within the ruling Bangladesh National Party concerns who will be selected as vice president and become the heir to Sattar.

The Bangladesh National Party, created by Zia, has managed to capture the middle ground in Bangladesh politics and to pull together many differing factions into one group. Furthermore, it has left the many opposition parties–with the exception of the Awami League–so badly fractured that they are seen as having no chance.

The only other candidate of note is retired Gen. M.S.G. Osmany, 63, who led the Bangladesh forces in the independence battles. He is running under the mantle of a citizens’ committee, not a party, and is calling for a switch from the presidential to the parliamentary form of government.

During her interview, Hasina remained coy about whether she would run for president and, indeed, whether the Awami League would participate at all in the election.

“If the elections are not free and fair,” she said, “what is the use of participating?”

Furthermore, some of her close associates in the Awami League are known to have advised her to stay out of the election on the grounds that she is unlikely to win this time around.

She has no base of her own in Bangladesh, and her only support comes from being Mujib’s daughter. Both she and the Awami League are tarred with the brush of being pro-India at a time when feeling against New Delhi is running high in the country.

The pro-India taint intensified when Hasina hesitated for months before returning here after Zia guaranteed her a safe conduct and the Awami League elected her its president. Moreover, her husband, an atomic scientist, has remained in New Delhi where he works for the Indian government.

Although India played a major role in Bangladesh’s independence struggle, the two neighboring nations have fallen out in recent years. At present there are major points of friction, including a longstanding dispute over water rights and strong disagreement over the ownership of a newly formed island in the Bay of Bengal that Indian forces have occupied.

It is difficult to say how much popular support Hasina’s Awami League retains. Most political observers here believe it still can muster crowds of faithful for its rally on the strength of Mujib’s name alone.

But the mob of followers who normally cluster around major political figures in South Asia was missing from Mujib’s house after Hasina moved in last week. There were only a handful of people in her downstairs waiting room one morning last week compared to the hundreds that gathered there in her father’s day.

That was viewed as significant by long-time Western and Bangladeshi observers of South Asian politics

For this desperately poor country, however, the more significant question is how much has its development program been hampered by the political confusion following the May 30 assassination of the energetic and well-liked Zia.

He was known as the nation’s cheerleader and had made an international reputation for trying almost singlehandedly to lift Bangladesh from its position as the basket case of the world to a country with a viable economy. He was far from accomplishing that aim, but he appeared to have injected a sense of purpose into Bangladesh missing from most Third World nations.

There is no question that the momentum has been stalled during the past three months because of the attention that has been focused on politics. Yet the constitutional process has taken hold and elections are scheduled.

Nonetheless, there are fears that the violent strain that pervades Bangladesh politics may be coming to the fore. Already there are reports of explosions in Dacca and Deputy Prime Minister S. A. Bari has called on the Awami League to shun violence. Hasina, however, denied that her party has been violent and accused the ruling party of attacking Awami League workers.

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PUBLISHED ON SEPTEMBER 10, 1981

Posted in BENGALI NATIONALISM, CHALLENGES, CURRENT ISSUES, HISTORY OF BENGAL, SHEIKH HASINA | Leave a comment

SHEIKH HASINA’S POPULARITY MARKS SIGNIFICANT RISE: IRI SURVEY

SHEIKH HASINA’S POPULARITY MARKS SIGNIFICANT RISE: IRI SURVEY

The popularity of prime minister Sheikh Hasina had marked a significant rise as around 66 per cent of people in the country had lent out their support for the Bangladesh premier while the Awami Leagueled government rode on at 64 per cent public support, said a survey conducted by the IRI.

The Washington-based International Republican Institute conducted the survey between April 10 and May 21, 2018. BSS received a copy of the survey in Dhaka on Monday.
The IRI collected data using a multi-stage stratified probability sample through in-person, in-home interviews. The sample was stratified by division, by district and by urban and rural locations.

The majority of people said the country was marching ahead in the right direction under the leadership of prime minister Sheikh Hasina while a sense of high optimism was vindicated over the current economic situation, said IRI, a non-profit and nonpartisan organisation committed to advancing freedom and democracy worldwide.

The IRI worked in Asia, Europe, Africa, Eurasia, Latin America and the Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa.

The 33-page survey titled ‘National Survey of Bangladesh Public Opinion’ said that a staggering 62 per cent people believed the country was moving in the right direction and as many as 69 per cent people were satisfied with the current state of the economy.

On a similar note, overwhelming support was found in the government’s effort to ensure public security, given that around 68 per cent people were satisfied with the current security situation and 57 per cent people believed the security situation would improve in the coming days, said the survey.

Regarding provision of basic services, the government enjoyed an upbeat mood as 67 per cent people were happy with healthcare services, 64 per cent with power supply and 61 per cent with the development of roads, highways and bridges.

On the current state of democracy, around 51 per cent people expressed satisfaction with the current state of democracy and 51 per cent of the population vindicated their trust on the works of the parliament.

In addition, around 81 per cent people said they would cast their votes in the upcoming election while 51 per cent gave an affirmative nod to the current state of democracy in the country.

The sample consisted of 5,000 respondents, aged 18 and older, and was representative of the votingage adults nationally.

An earlier survey conducted by International Republican Institute illustrated a similar tenor of public opinion on the country’s progress.

Released in January 2016, the poll divulged 64 per cent of the respondents thought the country was heading in the right direction.

Another survey, conducted and released in 2015 by the British Council, ActionAid Bangladesh and the University of Liberal Arts Bangladesh, showed 75 per cent of Bangladeshi youths saw the country as a more prosperous nation in the next 15 years and 60 per cent thought the country was heading in the right direction.

Preference of the survey participants revealed that Sheikh Hasina stood out as the most popular and trusted national leader in the country. 72.3 per cent respondents had a ‘good’ opinion about Sheikh Hasina’s capacity to run the country. In contrast, only 26.6 per cent respondents had a good opinion about Khaleda Zia running the country.

According to another 2015 IRI survey, around 67 per cent respondents said that Sheikh Hasina was the prime minister to be relied upon.

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SEPTEMBER 04, 2018

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BANGLADESH TO BE 26TH LARGEST ECONOMY IN THE WORLD

BANGLADESH TO BE 26TH LARGEST ECONOMY

HSBC report says the country will be the biggest mover in global GDP ranking in 2030

M FAILURE RAHMAN

Bangladesh is likely to be the biggest mover in the global gross domestic product rankings in 2030, becoming the 26th largest economy in the world from 42nd now, according to the latest report of HSBC Global Research.

The report — The World in 2030: Our long-term projections for 75 countries — showed Bangladesh’s economy would jump 16 notches, the highest by any country, between 2018 and 2030.

Bangladesh would be followed by the Philippines, Pakistan and Vietnam and Malaysia on the list of the biggest risers.

“The starting point for a country is a key part of its potential growth. It is very clear that a country such as Bangladesh has far more potential for growth than one like Norway, which is far richer,” said the report, which was published recently.

HSBC’s long-term growth model projections showed that the real GDP growth of Bangladesh would be 7.1 percent per year up to 2030, the highest among the 75 countries included in the report.

The country is projected to grow 7.3 percent from 2018 to 2023, 7.0 percent from 2023 to 2028, and 7.2 percent from 2028 to 2033.

Bangladesh will be a $700 billion economy in 2030 from $300 billion now, according to the report.

The research refreshed HSBC’s long-term forecasting framework to make model projections for 75 developed, emerging and frontier economies to assess growth potential and changes in global rankings by 2030.

The report said China is set to continue to be the single biggest contributor to global growth over the next decade and by 2030, will have become the world’s largest economy. One of the most striking rises amongst the rankings will be by India, which is set to become the world’s third-largest economy in just over a decade, up from seventh today – leapfrogging the second- and third-largest developed economies of Germany and Japan.

The report focuses on six main categories of economic indicators: catch-up potential, population (size and shape), human capital (education and healthcare), politics, openness and technology.

Better educated workers are more likely to be productive, it said.

Poorer countries will have room to catch up by simply adopting best practice elsewhere, and those with strong governance are more likely to facilitate investment and growth. Environmental challenges will be one of the policy challenges, said the report.

“It is no coincidence that four of the top six countries for projected growth – India, Pakistan, the Philippines and Bangladesh – also top the list of countries that have estimated to be the most vulnerable to climate change.”

The report said the biggest immediate danger to the projections is if the open borders that have delivered so much prosperity are closed.

“Recent actions by the US administration are not encouraging on this front as it is hard to see how such a wave of protectionism could benefit any individual economy, or the system as a whole.” Global growth would inevitably be weaker but as always, there would be distributional effects, it said.

The impact on confidence and investment would likely be negative while the disruption to integrated global supply chains established over the past few decades would ultimately weigh on living standards.

Natural disasters can send economies seriously off course as their development seeks to replace what was lost (although they have a temporary upward impact on GDP growth) rather than make any further leap forward.

The report said the quality of institutions will play a big role in delivering on the potential growth in a country. Without a regulatory environment that makes investment attractive and facilitates investment, potential growth will be lower.

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OCTOBER 04, 2018

Posted in ACHIEVEMENTS - SUCCESS, CHALLENGES, CURRENT ISSUES, ECONOMY, ENERGY - NATURAL RESOURCES, FOREIGN RELATIONS & POLICY, GLOBAL INDICATORS & BENCHMARK, GROWTH & TARGET, HISTORY OF BENGAL, INDUSTRIES, REGIONAL COOPERATION, Regional Policy, SHEIKH HASINA | Leave a comment

HPM SHEIKH HASINA RECEIVES‘INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARD’ AND THE ‘2018 SPECIAL DISTINCTION AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING LEADERSHIP’

HPM SHEIKH HASINA RECEIVES‘INTERNATIONAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARD’ AND THE ‘2018 SPECIAL DISTINCTION AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING LEADERSHIP’

Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina has been conferred with the prestigious ‘International Achievement Award’ and the ‘2018 Special Distinction Award for Outstanding Leadership’ for her humanitarian and responsible policy in hosting the Rohingyas.

Inter Press Service (IPS), a global news agency, conferred the ‘International Achievement Award’ on her, while the Global Hope Coalition, a network of three not-for-profit foundations based in New York, Zurich and Hong Kong, honoured the prime minister with the ‘2018 Special Distinction Award for Outstanding Leadership’.

The prime minister received the awards at two separate functions here Thursday evening.

She received the ‘International Achievement Award’ from Director General of International Organization for Migration Ambassador William Lucy Swing at a high-level reception at the Conference Room 8 of the UN Headquarters here.

Under Secretary General of the UN Office of the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Mark Lowcock and Canadian Minister for International Development Marie-Claude Bibeau spoke at the function while Director-General of IPS International Farhana Haque Rahman delivered the welcome address.

Sheikh Hasina received the ‘2018 Special Distinction Award for Outstanding Leadership’ from Irina Bokova, Honorary President of Global Hope Coalition, at the annual awards dinner of the organisation here.

The three other world leaders who also received the awards are President of Niger Mahamadou Issoufu, President of Tunisia Beji Caid Essebsi and Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras.

Receiving the awards, the prime minister said: “I dedicate this award to the people of my country who have opened their hearts and houses to shelter 1.1 million traumatised forcibly displaced Myanmar nationals”.

On this very auspicious moment, the prime minister remembered Father of the Nation Bangbandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman under whose visionary leadership Bangladesh earned sovereignty and independence in 1971.

Sheikh Hasina said she believes that it is the duty of all responsible nations to show humanity to the distressed and displaced people all around the world.

“In our efforts to provide humanitarian assistance to the forcibly displaced Rohingyas from our own resources, we allocated approximately US$ 5 million,” she said.

Additional amount of roughly US$ 380 million is allocated for building homes and fortify land, she said.

“We have to bear in mind that the causes of the crisis is rooted in Myanmar. Hence, the solution is also to be found in Myanmar,” she said.

Sheikh Hasina put emphasis on creating a conducive environment in Myanmar for ensuring safety, dignity, livelihood options and re-integration process for the return of the Rohingyas to Myanmar.

“The international community has a clear obligation to collectively address the source of the problem in Myanmar and engage effectively with its government to prevent further exodus,” she said.

In addition, Sheikh Hasina said, the voluntary return of Rohingyas can only be ensured with collective actions by the international community to ensure prevention of repetition of atrocity crimes against ethnic and religious minorities in Myanmar by establishing international, independent and impartial mechanism to put accountability into effect.

During the Bangladesh’s nine-month Liberation War, the premier said, about 10 million people of Bangladesh took refuge in India. “I and my family became internally displaced in Dhaka itself in 1971 during our Liberation War. I was at that time expecting my first child who was born in captivity,” she said.

“I was also forced to stay out of the country for 6 long years as refugee after my father, the Father of the Nation, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman, along with my mother, three brothers, the youngest one only a 10-year-old, sisters-in-law, uncle, was brutally assassinated on 15 August in 1975. Who else could better realise the pain and distress of a refugee,” she said.

The prime minister thanked the Inter Press Service for enormous contribution to the field of journalism.

She expressed sincere gratitude to the Global Hope Coalition and its Honorary President Ms Irina Bokova for recognising the efforts of her government and the people of Bangladesh with this honour.

“Nonetheless, I wish I never had to stand here for the reason I am standing here today. I wish the world never had to witness the worst form of violence and atrocities that has been committed against the Rohingyas in Myanmar,” she said.

The premier called upon the international community to keep up their pressure on Myanmar and resolve the Rohingya crisis at the earliest.

Prime Minister’s younger sister Sheikh Rehana, LGRD and Cooperatives Minister Engineer Khandakar Mosharraf Hossain, Foreign Minister AH Mahmood Ali, PM’s ICT Adviser Sajeeb Wazed Joy, Energy Adviser Dr Towfiq-e-Elahi Chowdhury, State Minister for Foreign Affairs Md Shahriar Alam, State Minister for Health Zahid Malek Swapan, Chairman of the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Foreign Ministry Dr Dipu Moni and other entourage members of the prime minister were present at the function.

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SEPTEMBER 28, 2018

Posted in ACHIEVEMENTS - SUCCESS, REFLECTION - Refreshing our Memories, RESPONSIBLE CITIZEN & DUTY, SHEIKH HASINA, SOCIO-ECONOMY -- Inequality, Poverty, Distribution & Poverty | Leave a comment

MAJORITY SUPPORT FOR AL, SHEIKH HASINA

MAJORITY SUPPORT FOR AL, SHEIKH HASINA

A majority of Bangladeshis are satisfied with the situation in their lives and are optimistic about the country’s progress, according to a recent opinion poll commissioned by The Independent and carried out by Research Development Centre (RDC) in the first quarter of 2017.

The participants in the poll also expressed greater approval ratings for Bangladesh Awami League (AL) and its President Sheikh Hasina compared to Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP) and its Chairperson Khaleda Zia.

The survey was carried out in March 2017 via telephone-interview of 1,005 adult people. A total of 1,005 households were sampled from RDC’s telephone bank of approximately 25,000 numbers obtained from previous surveys.

The accuracy is plus/minus 3.5 percent. [i.e. there is a 95 percent chance that the true value is in the range plus/minus 3.5 percent of the reported value.]

Greater Satisfaction and Optimism    

64 percent of the respondents feel that they have made progress in their lives, compared to 24.5 percent who feel that their lives have not progressed. 11.4 percent respondents feel that their position has remained unchanged.

In responding to the query as to whether their family’s financial position has improved, 54.5 percent believe it has, compared to 25.5 percent who answered in the negative. 19.9 percent respondents feel that their family’s financial position has remained the same as
before.  63 percent respondents feel that their family’s physical security has improved, compared to 16.9 percent who do not feel that there has been any improvement in this regard. 20 percent answered that the state of physical security of their families is the same as before.

68.6 percent respondents think the country is moving in the right direction. 13.7 percent of the respondents do not think that the country is not moving in the right direction. 10.3 percent respondents did not know the answer to the question, while 7.4 percent refrained from answering.

Greater Approval for Awami League

When asked about their opinion of AL, 56.9 percent responded that they have a ‘good’ opinion about the party. In contrast, only 18.5 percent expressed a ‘good’ opinion about BNP. 15 percent respondents expressed a ‘good’ opinion about Jatiya Party (JP).

Only 2.6 percent of the respondents expressed a ‘bad’ opinion about AL. In comparison, 44.1 percent of the respondents held a ‘bad’ opinion about BNP, while 25.4 percent of the respondents expressed their negative opinion on JP.

25.6 percent of the respondents expressed an ‘acceptable’ opinion of AL, compared to 44.1 percent for BNP, and 20.7 percent of JP. Some respondents either ‘did not know’ or ‘refused’ to express their opinion about the political parties. For AL that number was 15 percent, 22 percent for BNP, and 38.9 percent for JP.

When asked who they would vote for, if elections were held on that day, 36.1 percent respondents said they would vote for AL. In contrast, only 3.5 percent responded that they would vote for BNP. The numbers for JP and Jamaat E Islami (JeI) are 1.2 percent and 0.4 percent respectively.

These numbers regarding AL and BNP are quite close to the last similar opinion poll carried out by the Washington-based Democracy International in October 2016, in which 38 percent respondents said they would vote for AL while only  5
percent stated that they would vote for BNP. Regarding the sliding numbers for BNP, when asked for comments, political analysts stated that the reasons may include the record of governance in 2001-06, helping Jamaat-e-  Islami attempt to block the war crimes trials, and especially the street violence on civilians centering the 2014 elections and the following year in 2015.

49.7 percent of the respondents remain undecided, while 7.5 percent refused to say who they would vote for. Interestingly, 1 percent respondents said they would not vote at all. It is to be noted that the rise in the number of undecided voters correspond with the decline in the support for BNP. While the stated electoral support for AL has remained more or less same, there has been decline in the support for BNP, as apparent from this and other similar previous polls. This might indicate that people who would have otherwise voted for BNP in the past are now undecided on their choice.

AL More Popular Among Youths Than BNP

Support for AL over BNP is also strong among the youths of Bangladesh. When
asked about their opinions about the party, 55.4 percent of the respondents aged 18-29 said they had a ‘good’ opinion of AL, compared to 20.8 percent for BNP. Only 2.5 percent respondents in this age group has a ‘bad’ opinion of AL, compared to 13.8 percent for BNP. Regarding who they would vote, 35.8 percent youths respondents mentioned support for AL, compared to only 3.4
percent for BNP.

Greater Favourability of Sheikh Hasina         

The poll shows Sheikh Hasina to be clearly more popular than her rival Khaleda Zia. 72.3 percent respondents have a ‘good’ opinion about Sheikh Hasina running the country. In contrast, only 26.6 percent respondents have a good opinion about Khaleda Zia running the country.

Only 2 percent of the respondents expressed a ‘bad’ opinion about Sheikh Hasina running the country. In comparison, 13.6 percent of the respondents held a ‘bad’ opinion about Khaleda Zia running the country.

Sheikh Hasina is also more popular among youth voters than Khaleda Zia. 71 percent of the respondents aged 18-29 have a ‘good’ opinion about Sheikh Hasina running the country, compared to 23.1 percent for Khaleda Zia. By the same token, only 2.8 percent of the youths have a ‘bad’ opinion of Sheikh Hasina, compared to 10.8 percent for Khaleda Zia.

Communications Tops Concerns

When asked what are the two most important problems for the society, communications (roads, traffic jams, lack of passenger sheds) came first with 48.3 percent of the respondents putting it as to the main problem for the society. High electricity/gas price came second having been mentioned by 41.7 percent of the respondents. These were followed by drug addiction, lack of drinking water, and erosion of moral values, having been identified by 13.2 percent, 12.8 percent and 10.2 percent respectively.

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JUNE 09, 2017

Posted in ACHIEVEMENTS - SUCCESS, CHALLENGES, CURRENT ISSUES, Distribution & Poverty, ECONOMY, IDENTITY & PATRIOTISM, INTERNATIONAL - PERCEPTION ON BANGLADESH, LOCAL PRINT & DIGITAL MEDIA, Poverty, REFLECTION - Refreshing our Memories, RESPONSIBLE CITIZEN & DUTY, SHEIKH HASINA, SOCIAL SECURITY, SOCIETY, SOCIO-ECONOMY -- Inequality, SOCIO-ECONOMY -- Inequality, Poverty, Distribution & Poverty, TRANSPARENCY & CORRUPTION CONTROL | Leave a comment

SHEIKH HASINA: DAUGHTER OF DEMOCRACY AND HERALD OF CHANGE

SHEIKH HASINA: DAUGHTER OF DEMOCRACY AND HERALD OF CHANGE

She gave the nation a new vision – Vision 2021, transforming Bangladesh into a middle-income country. She gave Bangladeshis the dream of Digital Bangladesh- an IT-based country. Four decades into independence, she has brought solace for 3 million martyrs and their families by initiating the much-awaited war crimes trial.

Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina led the country to witness the economy growing at a record pace. Her prudent leadership ensured the primary school enrolment rate reaching the highest it has ever been. Her visionary approaches to women empowerment earned her global acclamation. During her first tenure, she made the peace treaty – ending decades-long conflict between indigenous people and Bengali settlers. Most importantly, she is the custodian of the spirit of 1971-Liberation War of Bangladesh.

The daughter of assassinated parents – the sister of murdered brothers, she literally turned grief into courage to lead the country. Following the assassination of most of her family members by a group of disgruntled army officers, she had to spend six years in exile. Her comeback, in 1981, meant the comeback of democracy, the farewell to unelected power and beginning of the national progress. She herself survived as many as 19 murder attempts including 2004-grenade attack by militants, backed by the then BNP led government.

Elected the Prime Minister for the third time in 2014, she is putting her best to build a poverty and hunger free country as envisioned by her father –the father of the nation – Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman.

A Born Leader

She was born in Tungipara of Gopalganj district on September 28, 1947 – the year marking the births of two countries – India and Pakistan. Bangladesh became a part of Pakistan. Her father spent most of times organizing movements against the repressive regime of Pakistan. Sheikh Hasina as a student leader took part in pro-liberation movements. She actively participated in anti-Aiyub (the then President of Pakistan) movement in 1962.

As the Vice President of the students’ union at Eden College, she led a movement in demand of building Shaheed Minar (memorial for language martyrs) in all educational institutes. Her movement turned into a success. Language heroes sacrificed their lives in 1952 protesting Pakistan’s decision to wipe out Bangla as a state language. During the 1971-Liberation War of Bangladesh, her father Bangabandhu was arrested and landed in Pakistani jail. Sheikh Hasina with her mother Begum Mujib, both confined to house, played a vital strategic role in the war.

Champion of Change 

On December 12, 2008 evening, Sheikh Hasina presented “the charter of change” – the election manifesto of Awami League which later became the unanimously accepted charter in the ninth parliamentary election. In the election, her party won 264 seats out of 300. The charter outlined the nation’s roadmap to become a middle income country within 2021.

To that goal, under her discreet leadership, the national GDP rose to 7.01 – the per capita income soared to USD 1466 – poverty dropped by its half to 22.04% – 10 million jobless were employed.

She herself is one of top 100 women in the world. She works untiringly to transform the fate of country’s women as well. Her remarkable contribution to women and girls education earned her ‘Tree of Peace’ award by UNESCO.

Her policies have turned around 20 million lives. The United Nations General Assembly has adopted her six-point resolution on poverty. In addition, many state-premiers and international organisations working on reducing poverty have come up with effusive praises for her.

During first term, her government constructed Jamuna Multi-purpose bridge, 11th largest bridge of the world. In the wake of the devastating 1998-flood, her government supplied food to around 20 million helpless people. Some remarkable achievements also took place in that regime – gaining food security, 21st February (mother language day of Bangladesh) getting recognized as the International Mother Language Day.

For her contribution in expanding information technology, ensuring healthcare to grassroots level, improvement of society’s distress people through safety net programme and success in poverty alleviation, she has been honored with ‘South South Cooperation Visionary’ Award of United Nations.

For building a healthy future for the her people and to set an example for the developing countries, Sheikh Hasina put her best to ensure healthy mother and healthy child. This tireless effort came with an achievement in 2011 as Bangladesh achieved the Millennium Development Goal of reducing child mortality by 50 percent well ahead of 2015.

The Path Finder of Democracy

Sheikh Hasina led Bangladesh to the path to democracy. With her untiring struggle and dynamic leadership, she had been succeeded in her attempt to free the country from the deadly clutch of military regime in 1990 through the all-party political movement.

Her party Awami League became the main opposition under her leadership through 1991-national election. In 1996, her leadership led Awami League to secure a win in the national election

Black chapters again took over in 2001. BNP-Jamaat formed the government. It was in this tenure militants raise their ugly heads. Simultaneous bombing in all 64 districts of Bangladesh occurred on a single day, 17th August, 2005.On January 11, 2007, the Awami League’s all-out movement, led by Sheikh Hasina, resulted in the cancellation of the election – an evil design of the incumbent BNP-Jamaat alliance to assume state power depriving people of their rights to franchise. The state of emergency was announced. A military backed caretaker government took over. Conspiracies went on to overthrow Sheikh Hasina from politics. She was arrested on July 16, 2007.

Amid public protest and mass signatures against her detention, she was released in parole on June 11, 2008. She went abroad for treatment and came back on December 4. Her party won the ninth parliamentary election.

Upon completion of successful five year, public faith in her Vision-2021 got her elected again in 2014 for next five years.

As for her noble cause, she has always been a target of militants and fundamentalists due to her anti-terrorism stance. Till date, she survived as many as 19 murder attempts – the fiercest one taking place on 21st June, 2004. It appeared like a doom’s day at the capital’s Bangabandhu Avenue. Grenades were showered on a Sheikh Hasina-led anti-terrorism rally. Then came bullets. Party leaders, activists and supporters cordoned around Sheikh Hasina, the then leader of opposition. At least 30 (thirty) of them died.

In the aftermath, the area was left with sandals, fleshes and blood. Hasina herself suffered severe hearing complications.

The Peacemaker

Throughout her life, Sheikh Hasina has demonstrated a resilient endeavor to promote peace and disarmament within the communities and across the globe. Her government strongly believes in the centrality and legitimacy of the UN as the custodian of global peace, security and development. Her commitment to international peace is manifested through Bangladesh’s flagship UNGA (United Nations General Assembly) Resolution on ‘Culture of Peace and Non Violence’. She has overseen the contribution of 128,133 peacekeepers in 54 peace missions of United Nation.

Earlier, in 1998, Sheikh Hasina persuaded India and Pakistan not to start nuclear-arm competition when both the nations tested explosions of nuclear bombs. In recognition of her contribution for signing of the CHT Peace Treaty, UNESCO bestowed its Houphouet-Boigny Peace Prize upon her. In 2013, she received Rotary Peace Prize.

On January 12, 2010, she was awarded Indira Gandhi peace Prize for her campaign for peace and development.

Custodian of the Spirit of 1971 

Flag destroyers cannot be trusted with flags. But a previous government had given the war criminals of the Liberation War of 1971, the rights to put national flag on their cars! The ‘Razakaars’ who assisted the West Pakistani Army to kill 3 million Bangladeshi people and rape 300,000 mothers and sisters, were awarded with ministries to govern! Voted back to power for the second time, Sheikh Hasina, in 2009, set up the highly transparent, impartial and independent International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) in line with her electoral promise to end the culture of impunity enjoyed by the war criminals. Some of the sentences have been carried out. Many of the war criminals are now facing the trial.

Protector of Our Nation’s Sovereignty

Thanks to her visionary diplomatic policies, the parliament of India has passed the historic Land Boundary Agreement with Bangladesh. This marked the end to four decades of old miseries of the enclave people. During her 2009-2013 tenure, Bangladesh won two maritime disputes with India and Myanmar. Bangladesh gained 19,467 square-kilometres out of total 25,602 square-kilometres disputed area with India in the Bay of Bengal.

Conclusion

Unyielding struggle and revolutionarily works of Sheikh Hasina for the betterment of mankind have made her a leader beyond the boundaries. Honors and awards continue to follow her. Now she has set her goal to uphold Bangladesh to the developed world. With her uncompromising stance towards the betterment of her men and her long journey in country’s development, it is needless to say, only Sheikh Hasina holds the key to the future Bangladesh.

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SEPTEMBER 27, 2018

 

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SHEIKH HASINA: REFLECTIONS OF A CITIZEN

SHEIKH HASINA: REFLECTIONS OF A CITIZEN

The first time I met Sheikh Hasina was on an evening in May 1981, a few days after her return from exile in Delhi to take over the leadership of the Awami League. It was a reception arranged for her on the spacious lawn of architect Mazharul Islam’s residence in Paribagh. I was there not by invitation but as somewhat of a gate-crasher. His daughter, my good friend Dalia Nausheen (today a reputed Nazrul artiste), who was my colleague at the Dhaka YMCA where we both taught English, had brought me along to meet the new Awami League leader. It was an opportunity I was not ready to pass. With Dalia I went over to her place. On that occasion, it was only a hello that I exchanged with Sheikh Hasina. She was young. Her smile was infectious.

It was a few years later, on a very monsoon morning in 1987, that Bangabandhu’s cousin Mominul Haque, whose daughter Farhana was my student, turned up at the Lalmatia home where my wife Zakia and I lived. It was rather early, one of those mornings where you did not feel like getting out of bed. But there was Mominul Haque, our dear Khoka Bhai (who a few years prior to his death left a very riveting account of the life Bangabandhu’s family led in some of its darkest moments), asking me to get ready for breakfast with Sheikh Hasina. That was a happy shock. By the way, Khoka Bhai and his daughter had come to know of my profound respect for Bangabandhu through observing a bust of the Father of the Nation we had in our drawing room. The news must have trickled down to Sheikh Hasina and here I was, on that rainy morning, on my way to 32 Dhanmondi for breakfast with the new leader of the Awami League. I cannot pretend I was not nervous.

It was a memorable meeting. Sheikh Hasina, Khoka Bhai and I had a good, hearty, typically Bengali breakfast over a good conversation as it poured outside. The AL leader had meanwhile been reading my articles (I was new to journalism) and concluded, correctly, that I held Bangabandhu in deep, abiding respect. Our breakfast was in Bangabandhu’s library on the ground floor. I remember wondering, even as I conversed with Sheikh Hasina, what her feelings must have been given that it was the very place where the biggest tragedy had occurred in the history of the country in August 1975. I remember asking myself — I still have that question — how Sheikh Hasina and her sister Sheikh Rehana had managed to keep themselves together, in one piece, after all that massacre had taken place.

There have been assassinations in history, but rarely if at all have been the instances where entire families, or nearly, had been wiped out by gun-carrying men appearing in the depths of the dark. Aung San Suu Kyi lost her father to murder, Benazir Bhutto saw her father walk the gallows, Gandhi and John Kennedy and Martin Luther King were assassinated. In none of these instances were their families killed. In all these years that have passed since my reflections over breakfast at 32 Dhanmondi, I have never ceased to ask that question: how did Sheikh Hasina steel herself, through that huge tragedy, into becoming the powerful leader she is today.

My interaction with Sheikh Hasina has always been an occasion for me to rediscover anew the individual in her. After that breakfast morning, my contacts with her increased, to a point where I often had the opportunity to act as a speechwriter for her, especially when she travelled abroad in the Ershad years. During the campaign for the general elections of February 1991, I was part of the media team she constituted for herself and in that capacity I was present at 32 Dhanmondi on the occasions when foreign media needed to interview her. It felt good working in a very typical western way, briefing her on the kind of questions she could anticipate and the responses she would need to make. She was always ready to learn.

The Awami League defeat in the elections was disappointing. But my contacts remained. At one point, when the decision was made to transform Bangabandhu’s home into a memorial, I found myself part of a team tasked with the selection of photographs and other images that could go into the making of a gallery on the ground floor of the residence. We had a team, comprising Sheikh Hasina, the late Gaziul Haq, Baby Moudud, Siddiqur Rahman and myself, which had the job of sifting through the huge collection of photographs in Bangabandhu’s innumerable family albums and selecting the ones we needed for the memorial museum. It was painful being in Sheikh Kamal’s and Sheikh Jamal’s rooms. Indeed, it was agony being in that home knowing how iconic it had become in history and yet remembering what terrible deeds had been done there by villainous men.

A fundamental part of my work, as the museum took shape, was looking into the English language captions of the photographs which today line the walls of the Bangabandhu Memorial Museum. In one corner of the hall, a large photograph of the truck bringing Bangabandhu, in January 1972, from the old Tejgaon airport to the Race Course (now Suhrawardy Udyan) is set against the wall. Every time I visit the museum, I watch that picture, knowing that at the back of the truck, invisible to the photographer, I am hanging on. I would hang on there, all the way to the Race Course. I once told Sheikh Hasina the story. She was amused.

As the Prime Minister steps into her seventieth year — she is one of those people you can safely describe as Midnight’s Children, having been born slightly over a month after the cataclysm of Partition in 1947 — I reflect on the sheer grit and determination with which she has pursued politics as a career. One of the happiest moments for this nation was the day Sheikh Hasina took over as Bangladesh’s Prime Minister in June 1996. It was in the evening when, having been sworn in at Bangabhaban, she arrived at 32 Dhanmondi with her husband, the decent, self-effacing Dr. Wazed Miah. It was a moment poignant with huge pain and great joy. The pain was in remembering that on the stairs of that residence the Father of the Nation had lain, done to death by dark conspiracy. The joy was in experiencing Bangabandhu’s daughter finally making it to power. She was a power woman who had proved her mettle as a politician. With so many others, I watched the nation’s new leader. I remember that as she stepped out of the car, I told her, in English, ‘Welcome home, Prime Minister’. For the very first time in all the years I had interacted with her, I thought it inappropriate to address her as Apa.

Yes, it is her courage, her steadfastness of purpose, her resilience which have made Sheikh Hasina the formidable politician she is today. Of course, there are the frailties, the indiscretions, the faux pas that emanate from her as they do from other politicians around the world. But for Bangladesh’s people, her leadership has been a historical necessity. Until she came along, no one really believed that Bangabandhu’s assassins could be brought to justice. Until she arrived, no one could imagine that the perpetrators of war crimes in 1971 could have their comeuppance. Until she took charge of her party, few thought that the long era of military and quasi-military rule would see its twilight. She has succeeded in achieving all three of these goals — and more.

Sheikh Hasina has always come across as a warm human being, a trait she has certainly inherited from her family. Even those who have not always agreed with her politics have remarked on the good cheer she exudes, on the sense of humour she exhibits in her moments away from the limelight. Abroad, she has interacted with statesmen with dignity becoming the elected leader of a nation. In the years I served as media spokesperson at our diplomatic mission in London, I had occasion to observe the gravitas she brought into her deliberations with other heads of government. I observed her in Edinburgh in 1997 as she engaged in good banter with Tony Blair; she engaged purposefully with Mahathir Mohammad and Inder Kumar Gujral; she went into friendly conversation with Nawaz Sharif despite the sensitivities of the past.

A couple of years ago, a telephone call from Ganobhaban for me made it known that the Prime Minister wished to see me. When I turned up in the evening, I realized that she had been kept in the dark about me. She had been looking for me but had been told I spent much of the year abroad and a very limited time at home. When I informed her it was absolutely the other way round, she appeared surprised. But why had she been wanting to see me? Her answer was touching, for it demonstrated her confidence in me. She had wanted me to render into English Bangabandhu’s posthumous memoirs, Oshomapto Atyojiboni. By then, the translated edition had already made its appearance.

On the last day of August this year, it was my privilege to share the stage with her at a discussion on Bangabandhu and Begum Fazilatunnesa Mujib. As I walked past her toward the microphones, she said softly, ‘Take as much time as you want. My speech will be brief.’ I ended up speaking for nearly an hour.

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MAY 15, 2018

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SHEIKH HASINA WORLD’S BEST IN DECISION MAKING

SHEIKH HASINA WORLD’S BEST IN DECISION MAKING

Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina has been considered as the most prudent leader in the world. Evaluating the decision-making expertise of the world leaders, Peoples and Politics conducted a study considering at least 5 criteria. These are, 1. What shortest possible time it took to make a decision? 2. How accurately was the decision considered? 3. What impact did the decision have on humanity? 4. What was the backwash of the decision? and 5.  What positive impact did the decision have on the prevailing problems?

According to the research of Peoples and politics, the most sensible decision taken by any leader of state or government in the past 5 years was `sheltering the persecuted Rohingyas of Myanmar`. In August 2017, Bangladesh opened its borders to the displaced Rohingyas. Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina commented that Bangladesh will help the persecuted. The second most prudent decision was of Germany`s Chancellor Angela Markel, who opened the borders of Germany to shelter refugees from war-torn countries. The decision to screen thousands of refugees of the Syrian civil war was brave, exact and humanitarian. UK`s former Prime Minister David Cameron`s announcement of resignation following the victory for leave supporters was the third best decision in the last 5 years. This decision is said to be a unique example of respecting the democracy and people`s opinion according to Peoples and Politics. The fourth most sensible decision was made by Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan when he asked the people to occupy the streets by sending a FaceTime message and curbed an attempted military coup. The fifth most effective decision according to the Peoples and Politics, was taken by Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. On November 2016, the Government of India announced the demonetization of all ₹500 and ₹1,000 banknotes of the Mahatma Gandhi series as a take on corruption, terrorism and black money. The decision was equally challenging and risky for the largest democracy of the world.

The backdrop of selecting Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina as the wisest decision maker among the world leaders, as stated in People and Politics` research study, is “Rohingya issue would have resulted in an undeniable humanitarian crisis if it wasn’t for Sheikh Hasina who made the kind-hearted, discreet and valiant decision.”  And not only the Rohingya issue, the research study had come up with several other examples which testify the bold, calculated and long-sighted decision-making aptness of Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina. Among them, the most acclaimed and praised decision was to construct the Padma Bridge with the country`s own funding. The `zero-tolerance` policy in countering militancy is exemplified as well as regarded as a model in the research paper.

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FEBRUARY 15, 2018

Posted in ACHIEVEMENTS - SUCCESS, CHALLENGES, CURRENT ISSUES, ECONOMY, FOREIGN RELATIONS & POLICY, RESPONSIBLE CITIZEN & DUTY, SHEIKH HASINA, SOCIETY, WORLD - GEOPOLITICS | Leave a comment

SHEIKH HASINA’S LEADERSHIP DELIVERS ON PROMISES

SHEIKH HASINA’S LEADERSHIP DELIVERS ON PROMISES

In the last 10 years, Bangladesh has come a long way on the road of development because one politician has kept her biggest promises and pledges to the people. In 2008, the yet-to-be Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina talked of ‘Vision 2021’ in her ‘Manifesto of Change’ (Din Badaler Ishtehar), an aspiration to turn our country into a middle-income country by 2021.

For the first 44 years of our existence, we were a low-income country. Then in July 2015, we became for the first time, a lower-middle income country, a substantial fulfilment of an ambitious pledge delivered six years before the stipulated deadline. As our economy grows at 7.86 percent rate, and per capita income increased from $759 to $1,752 within 10 years, we now have high hopes that we can indeed become a higher middle-income country by 2021.

It was also a moment of national pride to learn that after being a least developed country (LDC) for more than four decades, in March 2018, Bangladesh for the first time, fulfilled the eligibility requirements to graduate to the ‘Developing Country’ status, as per the UN Committee for Development Policy (CPD). While the official approval can be as far off as 2024 that Bangladesh is on the right development track and trajectory, cannot be denied.

These landmark strides do not appear out of a vacuum. They are a result of strong political will coupled with sound policies. The current government formulated and implemented effective long term and mid-term economic planning to aid in the task of achieving the development aspirations in the form of such instruments as the Perspective Plan 2010-2021, the Sixth Five Year Plan 2011-2015 etc.

But what differentiates Hasina from others is her ability to deliver on her plans, promises and pledges. Anyone can come up with plans or promise us the whole package. But till date, she has been the only politician who has been able to deliver too.

She promised to build a ‘poverty and hunger free’ Bangladesh in 2008. How much has she delivered really? Substantially. The poverty rate has now declined to 21.8 percent from 31.5 percent in 2010 and extreme poverty rate has been reduced to 11.3 percent from 17.6 percent. While reduced to numbers, this may not mean much to those of us living in relative comfort anyway, in real human terms, for millions of our fellow countrymen, this means not having to beg for food, not having to give up their children, or sacrifice their dignity.

Bangladesh is now almost self-sufficient when it comes to producing its own food grains, despite its decreasing land resources and huge population. Within a decade, food grain production has been increased from 27.2 million metric tonnes to 40 million metric tonnes. There used to be a term called ‘Monga’, famine due to seasonal joblessness, which used to plague our northern parts. We don’t hear that anymore.

The prime minister says she will provide electricity to every household by 2021. How much progress has been made on that front? A lot actually. By boosting Bangladesh’s power generation capacity from 4,942MW in 2009 to 20,000MW, 90 percent of the people have been brought under electricity coverage. With 56 more power plants now under construction having combined capacity of producing 14,134MW and diversification of energy options such as LNG, nuclear (eg the Rooppur Nuclear Power Project) and solar (4.5 million off grid solar home systems coupled with several grid-connected solar power plants) suggests that 100 percent electricity coverage by 2021 seems like a very realistic and achievable goal.

Ten years ago, when the slogan ‘Digital Bangladesh’ was floated by the Premier Sheikh Hasina, many were sceptical, as to whether an agrarian country like Bangladesh was indeed ready for digitization or whether the government could deliver on it. Not anymore though. With 151 million mobile users and 88 million internet users, even Hasina’s harshest critics don’t question whether Bangladesh has indeed gone digital in a decade. In fact, the harshest critics are often the digital kind.

Keeping in line with her party’s line of inclusive development and social justice, Hasina invested heavily on human development. In 2009, the value of our Human Development Index (HDI) was 0.535, it is now 0.608 according to the UN Human Development Report (HDR) 2018. Moreover, Bangladesh is now categorised as a ‘Medium Human Development’ country. For the last ten years, Bangladesh has steadily improved its position in every annual HDI.

This improvement is due to the fact that Bangladesh is investing in, and reaping benefits from, greater focus on education, health and skills enhancement. This is coupled with the current government’s social justice emphasis on women empowerment, children’s development, not leaving the marginalised like the Hijras behind and enhanced social security protection.

Bangladesh has also witnessed commendable progress over the last decade in such areas as communications infrastructure development. Apart from converting 465 km of highways into four-lanes and constructing numerous flyovers in major cities, several mega projects have been undertaken including the Padma Bridge and Dhaka Metro Rail.

When the World Bank pulled out of the Padma Bridge project on trumped up charges of corruption which have since been discredited by a Canadian court, Hasina promised to go ahead with the project with the country’s internal resources despite pressure from home and abroad. Now as more than 65 percent of the project stands completed, millions of people living in the country’s southern parts stand to be benefited in addition to the 1.2 percent increase to the country’s GDP that the bridge is expected to contribute once the structure is opened to traffic.

So, at the very least, on the development side of things, we can safely say that Hasina, in the last around 10 years, has been able to deliver on the biggest promises she made to the country and its people.

But many see the problem of corruption as overshadowing the development successes of the Hasina government. Perhaps, visibly, this is one of the sectors, where Bangladesh has not made desired progress. But how much progress, if at all, have we made?

In the corruption cases being filed by the Anti-Corruption Commission (ACC), the accused are being convicted in about 70 percent of these cases, which is a high conviction rate. The government has recently shown its political will to fight corruption and set a great precedent for other Member States of the UN by deciding to officially observe the International Anti- Corruption Day annually on Dec 9.

The government has increased the salaries and other benefits of public sector employees to commensurate with their needs and thereby discouraging unethical and illegal practices such as corruption. According to the Finance Minister AMA Muhith, these steps will show their true impact within the next 10 years in reducing corruption in the public sector.

The Awami League government has also facilitated the formation of Upazila anti-corruption committees. E-government procurement and other forms of e-governance, part of the Digital Bangladesh agenda, is helping cut down on public sector corruption and making public services more citizen friendly in Bangladesh. Unsurprisingly, Bangladesh improved by nine steps in the latest UN E-governance Development Index 2018, currently standing as 115th among 193 countries.

Bangladesh has made steady progress in the Corruption Perception Index (CPI) of Transparency International (TI). Bangladesh was placed at the bottom of the list for five successive years from 2001-2005, earning it the infamy of being the most corrupt in the world among 180 countries. Since 2009, in every ranking, Bangladesh has been steady progress in the right direction, and in the last such ranking CPI 2017, Bangladesh was 143rd among 180 countries.

While we may still have a long way to go in terms of matching our development successes with our governance aspirations, for the latter too, I would entrust my faith and support to the leader who has been able to deliver on her promises regarding the former. That is Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina.

Because there is no Plan B. Either she succeeds, or we end up in another period like 2001-06, when development not only ceased, but also regressed. An era when not only were few new hospitals made, existing community clinics were shut down; when not only power generation did not increased in five years, but somehow mysteriously, came down; when not only were terrorists were not fought, but groups like Harkat-ul-Jihad al-Islami and Jama’at-ul-Mujaheedin received state patronisation; when war criminals like Motiur Rahman Nizami and Ali Ahsan Mohammad Mujahid became government ministers and grenades were hurled on political opponents and diplomats.

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SEPTEMBER 21, 2018
Shah Ali Farhad is a lawyer, researcher and political activist. He is currently serving the Centre for Research and Information (CRI) as its Senior Analyst. He is also a Member of the activists’ and experts’ group International Crimes Strategy Forum (ICSF).
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