FACING UP TO 1971


FACING UP TO 1971

jamaat-leadSyed Badrul Ahsan

in January this year, have received wide public support and have reinforced the conviction that Hasina is determined to take the trials of all war criminals now in prison to a definitive conclusion. She patently has public support on the issue, a factor that has kept the Jamaat’s old ally, the BNP, from voicing a public declaration of support or sympathy for the party over its recent misfortunes. Indeed, the BNP stayed away from expressing condolences on the death of Ghulam Azam and has kept its silence on the verdicts in relation to Nizami and Quasem Ali.

The strategy has not been lost on political quarters across the country. It is a stance that led a son of Ghulam Azam into venting his anger at the BNP, which he accused of letting down the Jamaat.

While the pace of the war crimes trials has certainly picked up and drawn public support, there are obvious signs of the government becoming self-confident about its actions. It remains dismissive of the BNP’s repeated calls for a dialogue on what Zia sees as a new election under a caretaker administration. The government remains unmoved and insists that it will go the full five years of its current term in office. Under the provisions of the constitution, the next election will be held in 2019. The BNP has, in these past few months, been threatening a mass movement to force the government to concede new elections. But with almost all its senior leaders, including Zia, being enmeshed in legal problems and the party itself in disarray, its immediate future does not look good.

The war crimes trials and the predicament of the political opposition apart, there is genuine concern in Bangladesh today about reports of Jamaat-ul-Mujahideen Bangladesh (JMB) fugitives finding shelter in the Indian state of West Bengal and allegedly planning terror operations, including assassinations of Sheikh Hasina and Khaleda Zia in Dhaka. These reports have rattled Dhaka to the extent that Bangladesh’s prime minister has made it clear that while her government has put an end to activities on Bangladesh soil by Indian separatists, it is now for the Indian authorities to take action against Bangladeshi criminals holed up in India. A particular point is not missed in Dhaka — that West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee, by ignoring these fugitive Islamists in her narrow electoral interest of reaching out to the Muslim community, has helped create a new crisis in the region. The Trinamool Congress government goes on losing friends in Bangladesh. The process began when Banerjee put up roadblocks to a deal former Indian PM Manmohan Singh was expected to reach with Hasina a few years ago.

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The writer is associate editor, ‘The Daily Observer’, Dhaka
NOVEMBER 08, 2014

INDIANEXPRESS

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An aware citizen..
This entry was posted in CURRENT ISSUES, DEFENCE & SECURITY, FOREIGN RELATIONS & POLICY, HISTORY OF BENGAL, REGIONAL COOPERATION, Regional Policy, STRATEGY & POLICY, SYED BADRUL AHSAN. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to FACING UP TO 1971

  1. Enayet Mowla says:

    Begum Khaleda’s repeated threatening to arrange a mass uprising in her favor seems now as the cry of a loan wolf in the wild. Nobody believes her now and she is not getting any support either, except, may be, from our Didi in the West Bengal. People there may have political differences in her favor or against her but not to the extent of supporting BNP and Jamaat to get involved in the affairs of West Bengal. Both Khaleda and our respected Didi may be are having their dreams.

    Like

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